Hardk Disk Repair

Integrity of Hard Disk Drive
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Due to the extremely close spacing between the heads and the disk surface, any contamination of the read-write heads or platters can lead to a head crash – a failure of the disk in which the head scrapes across the platter surface, often grinding away the thin magnetic film and causing data loss. Head crashes can be caused by electronic failure, a sudden power failure, physical shock, wear and tear, corrosion, or poorly manufactured platters and heads. The HDD’s spindle system relies on air pressure inside the enclosure to support the heads at their proper flying height while the disk rotates.

An HDD requires a certain range of air pressures in order to operate properly. The connection to the external environment and pressure occurs through a small hole in the enclosure, usually with a carbon filter on the inside. If the air pressure is too low, then there is not enough lift for the flying head, so the head gets too close the disk, and there is a risk of head crashes and data loss. Specially manufactured sealed and pressurized disks are needed for reliable high-altitude operation, above about 3,000 m. Note that modern commercial aircraft have a pressurized cabin, whose pressure altitude does not normally exceed 2,600 m – thus, ordinary hard drives can safely be used in flight. Modern disks include temperature sensors and adjust their operation to the operating environment. Breather holes can be seen on all disks – they usually have a sticker next to them, warning the user not to cover the holes. The air inside the operating disk is constantly moving too, being swept in motion by friction with the spinning platters. This air passes through an internal recirculation filter to remove any leftover contaminants from manufacture, any particles or chemicals that may have somehow entered the enclosure, and any particles or out gassing generated internally in normal operation. Very high humidity for extended periods can corrode the heads and platters.

For giant magneto resistive (GMR) heads in particular, a minor head crash from contamination (that does not remove the magnetic surface of the disk) still results in the head temporarily overheating, due to friction with the disk surface, and can render the data unreadable for a short period until the head temperature stabilizes.

The hard disk’s electronics control the movement of the actuator and the rotation of the disk, and perform reads and writes on demand from the disk controller. Modern disk firmware is capable of scheduling reads and writes efficiently on the platter surfaces and remapping sectors of the media which have failed.

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